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Mortgage Postcard Scam

POSTCARD NOTICE STATES:

"IMPORTANT NOTICE- RESPONSE NEEDED"

"You have recently closed on this mortgage with GRANDVIEW BK SSB. We need you to please call us about an important matter regarding this loan. This is time sensitive so please call us at 1-800-***-****.

Mortgage ID # *****

WHAT ARE THESE POSTCARDS AND WHO IS SENDING THEM?

Customers are reporting postcards urging them to call a number about a time-sensitive matter on their mortgage. These postcards (which come in a variety of colors) are being sent to consumers all around the country.

These postcards did not come from Grandview Bank, or any other financial institution. There is a small disclaimer in the bottom right corner indicating the sender is "not affiliated with, sponsored by, and loan information not provided by GRANDVIEW BANK SSB". It does further state that the information was provided by "H.W.C.".

HOW DID THE POSTCARD SENDERS GET MY INFORMATION?

At Grandview bank, we're committed to protecting our customer's personal information. Likewise, we do not sell or otherwise distribute it to non-affiliate third parties.

However, some information about mortgages, regardless of what lender the consumer works with, is public record. That's how someone like this will obtain your contact information. Do note- and should immediately alert you to the likelihood of something being a scam- the account number does not match yours..

WHAT IF I CALL THE NUMBER ON THE POSTARD?

We advise our customers NOT call the number listed. Calling the number may connect you with a real person, or it may connect you to automated recording prompts. Regardless, do not offer them your personal information.

WHAT SHOUD I DO IF I GET THIS POSTCARD?

The best thing to do is disregard the postcard. Dispose of it however you would any other junk mail you receive. In addition, you are always encouraged to contact us directly should you have questions about such matters.

ANATOMY OF A FAKE CHECK SCAM

Fake checks drive many types of scams- like those involving phony prize wins, fake jobs, mystery shoppers, online classified ad sales, and others. In a fake check scam, a person you don't know asks you to deposit a check-sometimes for several thousand dollars and usually for more than what you are owed- and wire some of the money back to that person. The scammers always have a good story to explain the overpayment- they're stuck out of the country, they need you to cover taxes or fees, you need to buy supplies, or something else. But by the time your bank discovers you've deposited a bad check, the scammer already has the  money you sent, and you're stuck paying the rest of the check back to the bank.

The Federal Trade Commission receives tens of thousands of reports each year about fake checks. Over the last three years, the number of complaints has steadily increased, and so have the dollars lost.

The FTC's new infographic developed with the American Bankers Association Foundation, offers some tip-offs to rip-offs and what to do if you get a check from someone you don't know.

Please share this information with others. Victims may be embarrassed to talk about their experiences, but you can help. A simple phone call, email or text, saying "Look what I just found" and sharing this information may make a difference in someone else's life.